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Four Antique Advertising Almanacs from the 1930s - $35 (near Stockbridge)

Four Antique Advertising Almanacs from the 1930s 1 thumbnailFour Antique Advertising Almanacs from the 1930s 2 thumbnailFour Antique Advertising Almanacs from the 1930s 3 thumbnailFour Antique Advertising Almanacs from the 1930s 4 thumbnailFour Antique Advertising Almanacs from the 1930s 5 thumbnailFour Antique Advertising Almanacs from the 1930s 6 thumbnailFour Antique Advertising Almanacs from the 1930s 7 thumbnailFour Antique Advertising Almanacs from the 1930s 8 thumbnailFour Antique Advertising Almanacs from the 1930s 9 thumbnailFour Antique Advertising Almanacs from the 1930s 10 thumbnail
condition: fair
These four advertising almanacs from approximately 90 years ago are neat to look at not only for the ads, but the articles as well. Each of them is 32 pages long and has a whole punched in the upper left hand corner, probably as part of a hanging display. Here’s the list:

***Rawleigh’s Good Health Guide (1931)

The Raleigh Co. had a whole boatload of different health items—pills, syrups, ointments, and toiletries. The company was sort of an early version of Amway. Along with typical almanac info, the guide includes several pages of healthy recipes as well as a list of all the Rawleigh’s products. The almanac has some discoloration but nothing to affect the graphics. Some handwriting on the cover with the customer’s name and address.

***Swamp Root Almanac Dream Book (1934)

Swamp Root, like a lot of quack medicine in the early 1900s, claimed its product as a “diuretic to the kidneys and bladder.” The almanac has great cover art (a little gouge on the bottom right border). Next to the Indian maiden is the 12 Zodiac signs with some artwork inside.

Inside the almanac, for each month, readers could get a condensed daily horoscope. There’s a whole page devoted to the dos and don’ts of social behavior. Probably the most interesting part are the three pages devoted to dream interpretation. The back cover is a little ragged but doesn’t interfere with the main graphics.

***Indian Root Pills

This advertising almanac had its own speciality. Dr. Morris’s Indian Root Pills claimed to treat constipation, bad breath, a poor complexion, and—my favorite—stomach worms. The almanac presents weather forecasts and important historical events for each day of the year. There’s a small chunk out of the bottom right hand corner of the cover.

***Dr. Miles New Weather Almanac (1937)

Dr. Miles hawked a couple of “remedies such as insomnia, pain, constipation, and various nervous conditions. Do I hear a duck quacking? Loads of colorful Alka Seltzer ads, which had plenty of other claims as well.

All four almanacs for $35.

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