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Rare Copy of Preston Tucker’s Aviation Corporation stock certificate - $120 (near Stockbridge)

Rare Copy of Preston Tucker’s Aviation Corporation stock certificate 1 thumbnailRare Copy of Preston Tucker’s Aviation Corporation stock certificate 2 thumbnailRare Copy of Preston Tucker’s Aviation Corporation stock certificate 3 thumbnailRare Copy of Preston Tucker’s Aviation Corporation stock certificate 4 thumbnailRare Copy of Preston Tucker’s Aviation Corporation stock certificate 5 thumbnailRare Copy of Preston Tucker’s Aviation Corporation stock certificate 6 thumbnailRare Copy of Preston Tucker’s Aviation Corporation stock certificate 7 thumbnailRare Copy of Preston Tucker’s Aviation Corporation stock certificate 8 thumbnailRare Copy of Preston Tucker’s Aviation Corporation stock certificate 9 thumbnailRare Copy of Preston Tucker’s Aviation Corporation stock certificate 10 thumbnail
condition: good
make / manufacturer: Preston T. Tucker
model name / number: Tucker Aviation Corporation

NOTE: Please excuse the glare in the first photo. It’s just.a reflection from the glass of the frame, and I didn’t have a polarizing filter.

A decade before Preston Tucker would produce the famous Tucker Torpedo car, he worked on military contracts. In 1937, Tucker anticipated World War II and designed the Tucker Tiger Tank. Like many of Tucker’s designs, it was too ahead of its time. The U.S. Army passed on his idea because the tank went too fast (over 100 m.p.h. on pavement and 65 on rough terrain.

The U.S. Navy liked Tucker’s turret design, though, and issued him a contract.

Tucker wound up moving to Ypsilanti, MI,,heading up and eventually buying the Ypsilanti Tool and Die Co., where he started The Tucker Aviation Corporation in 1940.

Besides the turret, Tucker also planned to produce the XP 57, a lightweight, single engine fighter plane nicknamed “The Peashooter.”

The plan could hit speeds of 308 m.p.h. and was designed to fire mostly 50 cal ammunition. Production never happened, though. It probably was too good.

In 1941, the year after Tucker began Tucker Aviation, the company went bankrupt.

It’s the same year as this stock certificate, dated March 31, 1941. Tucker was obviously in need of money.

I purchased this rare copy of a Tucker Aviation Corporation stock certificate years ago at the family’s estate sale west of Ann Arbor. I asked a family member if it was an original and he didn’t think it was. He remembered that copies were made for family members to display.

To be sure, I had LeBarre Galleries in New Hampshire look at it and they confirmed that it was a laminated copy. They pressed me to know if there was an original, which would have been worth thousands. Damn!

The certificate is dated March 31, 1941, for the amount of $9,435.

The Tucker family put the certificate in a nice frame, so I put it back. The certificate is standard sized, and the frame measures 16 x 13 inches.

I’ve seen plenty of Tucker Car Corporation stock certificates, but never a Tucker Aviation Corporation one—not even a copy.

post id: 7757966662

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